Friday, November 18, 2016

Rabbi's article and blessing for December issue of synagogue newsletter

Blessings for Unity

How blessed we are in our day and time!  We are free to study about Jewish tradition, learn something of the Hebrew language, offer traditional blessings for babies, for youth at bar or bat mitzvah, for a wedding couple under the chuppah, offer a Jewish purification and burial, and celebrate holy days and Shabbats together. No one stops us or has laws against gathering for worship or classes, or puts us in danger for identifying with our religion, as has happened so many times in our history. 

Please, please, take advantage of this precious freedom, of our teachers willing to pass down our heritage to each other and to the next generation of students. Please bring your own unique presence, talents, and insights to discuss the Torah portion of the week, or to take advantage of the many educational offerings planned for the coming months, or support the variety of cultural activities and social groups of our congregation.

Our country, and indeed the world, is in a tumultuous time of change, with unexpected events happening all around us, violence done to people of color or wearing an ethnic head covering, and amplified by the nightly news and headlines.  Let us unify as a community, and stand firmly for communication, compassion, and cooperation.  I will be wearing a safety pin on my clothing, a signal that is spreading as a symbol of a “safe person” who will come to the aid of anyone who is facing discrimination or attack.  I do not live in a large city and am not on busy streets or in subways or other public transportation, so I do not know how effective this symbol will be, but I hope the idea spreads and we all take responsibility for caring for the stranger, the minority person, the woman... anyone who finds him or herself in a hostile situation.  I call on my congregants, my clergy colleagues, and all in the wider community to proclaim our highest values and not let violence or discrimination be tolerated in our midst.


Let’s be positive and kind to each other….  a light to the nations.

And, in that spirit, you are invited to come to celebrate Hanukkah, festival of light and freedom, on Monday, December 26 at 4 p.m.


Blessing for Kislev  5777 (December 1 - 29, 2016)
At this darkest time of the year, we light candles to bring in light, symbolizing freedom.  May we all gather together to kindle the light of the Hanukkah candles.  May we be like the Shamash, the helper candle that is used to light the other candles, and kindle the soul-spark in those we encounter.  Our own light is never diminished by giving light to others.    – Amen.



Rabbi's article and blessing for December in synagogue newsletter

Blessings for Unity

How blessed we are in our day and time!  We are free to study about Jewish tradition, learn something of the Hebrew language, offer traditional blessings for babies, for youth at bar or bat mitzvah, for a wedding couple under the chuppah, offer a Jewish purification and burial, and celebrate holy days and Shabbats together. No one stops us or has laws against gathering for worship or classes, or puts us in danger for identifying with our religion, as has happened so many times in our history. 

Please, please, take advantage of this precious freedom, of our teachers willing to pass down our heritage to each other and to the next generation of students. Please bring your own unique presence, talents, and insights to discuss the Torah portion of the week, or to take advantage of the many educational offerings planned for the coming months, or support the variety of cultural activities and social groups of our congregation.

Our country, and indeed the world, is in a tumultuous time of change, with unexpected events happening all around us, violence done to people of color or wearing an ethnic head covering, and amplified by the nightly news and headlines.  Let us unify as a community, and stand firmly for communication, compassion, and cooperation.  I will be wearing a safety pin on my clothing, a signal that is spreading as a symbol of a “safe person” who will come to the aid of anyone who is facing discrimination or attack.  I do not live in a large city and am not on busy streets or in subways or other public transportation, so I do not know how effective this symbol will be, but I hope the idea spreads and we all take responsibility for caring for the stranger, the minority person, the woman... anyone who finds him or herself in a hostile situation.  I call on my congregants, my clergy colleagues, and all in the wider community to proclaim our highest values and not let violence or discrimination be tolerated in our midst.


Let’s be positive and kind to each other….  a light to the nations.

And, in that spirit, you are invited to come to celebrate Hanukkah, festival of light and freedom, on Monday, December 26 at 4 p.m.


Blessing for Kislev  5777 (December 1 - 29, 2016)
At this darkest time of the year, we light candles to bring in light, symbolizing freedom.  May we all gather together to kindle the light of the Hanukkah candles.  May we be like the Shamash, the helper candle that is used to light the other candles, and kindle the soul-spark in those we encounter.  Our own light is never diminished by giving light to others.    – Amen.



Thursday, July 28, 2016

Rabbi Magal's Talk Notes at International New Thought Alliance conference, Scottsdale, AZ July 12, 2016




For New Thought talk at INTA conference, July 12, 2016

Embassy Suites Scottsdale

Rabbi Alicia Magal

Jewish Community of Sedona and the Verde Valley



It would be very hard to enter on stage in a New Thought audience and be as colorful, forceful, and dazzling as Bishop Dr. Barbara King….

But she does inspire us to make a statement in our own style and not hide!

She was amazing at the Parliament for World Religions in Salt Lake City that I attended, and wrote an article for your New Thought Magazine reporting on my impressions of the speakers, and was so impressed with her fierce authenticity and presence.






(Itzhak blows shofar)

The shofar, ram’s horn, is an ancient instrument that sounded an alarm and gathered the people for assembly, and heralds an important moment.  Today the shofar is blown to WAKE US UP from our waking slumber in the month leading up to the Jewish New Year…and on the Holy Day itself, with various sounds like a wake-up call, sobbing in sorrow and repentance, and then a triumphant long blast of strength for life in the year ahead.  It calls us, down to our very cells, to be more aware of our old patterns and break them, to get back on track, to shed the crusty skin that may have hardened our hearts.

New Thought, as Laurel Lee and Joey Gorka described to me in a detailed chart, and as I researched the many strands and threads that grew out of teachings by Emerson, Quimby, William James, Whitehead, Emmet Fox, Mary Baker Eddy,  Theosophy, Metaphysics, Aldous Huxley, Thoreau,  even Eastern teachings of Confucius, Dao, Vedic teachings and Buddhism, and so any more strands that added to the seeking of truth and the divine nature dwelling within, I saw that these teachings and influences branched out into Science of Mind, Unity, and other related organizations.  The Principles include finding Truth by drawing on sources from the West and East, and the overall title appears to me to be not so much New Thought as RENEWED Thought, taking the rich heritage from 19th century philosophical movements, mind-body connection in healing, and a very wide range of great texts and teachers and constantly seeking to crack open any ritual or shell that has hardened the flowing, vibrant, juicy aliveness of the “AHA” moments that led to these practices. (crack open a nut, loudly. Actually, Itzhak created a really loud racking sound effect as I wielded a huge nut cracker).

In Judaism there are also many streams, one of which has come to be known as Renewal Judaism, in which ancient text and traditions are honored and studied, but the liturgy has been opened up, made egalitarian, with non-gendered God language, not “Him, Lord, Father,” but rather “Holy One, Creator, Source,” all capitals.  Also, ancient practices of Meditation, Chanting, Silence, and mystic practices have been revived and re-introduced along with composing new melodies for verses of Psalms or for prayers on Shabbat and Festivals.  Translating Hebrew prayers into contemporary poetic language also enables people of varying levels of knowledge to “get” the impact of the original Hebrew prayers and biblical verses, and helps cross the language barrier. The intention is to expand the ways in which this generation finds meaning, comfort, and vitality in religion. Part of my mission as a rabbi include “…Bringing Joyful Juicy Judaism to the next generation.”  

In ancient Israel, the Cohanim, the Priestly clan, had the task of lighting the menorah, a 7 branched candelabra, each evening, in the Temple, a constant rededication, rekindling of light.  After the Temple was destroyed in 70 CE by the Romans and most Jews were exiled from the Holy Land, they kept turning toward Jerusalem in prayer, and the customs developed to place above the ark holding the scrolls of the Torah (perhaps like the INTA archives building in Mesa) an Eternal Light which remains constantly lit.  To usher in the Sabbath on Friday evening, or on the eve of each festival, we kindle 2 candles. On Hanukkah we increase the number of candles lit each night for eight nights, with a helper candle that is used to light the other 8 candles.  The Shamash, or helper candle, is used as a metaphor for each of us… we inspire and kindle a spark in others, and our own light is not diminished.

Rekindling, renewing, cracking open a hardened shell…(another cracking sound effect here) these are all ways in which we reconnect with that divine spark of holiness in each one of us. 
How do you do it in your congregations and organizations? 
How many of you are leaders of services?   

How do you rekindle the spark in each of your members? 

Do you have a ritual that you use with kindling light?  In Sedona, my colleague Rev. Janet Kingsley at the Center for Positive Living, lights 5 votive candles for

1-honoring all faiths, paths, and spiritual leaders  

2- all peoples are connected to the One Universal Spirit

3- unity of all life

4- peace and compassion in the world

5- healing for those we love and those around the world in need of healing blessings

Shondra Jepperson, in charge of the music for that Center for Positive Living,  creates and sings music that is inspiring and gets people up on their feet smiling and lifting their arms in gratitude and joy.  Each of you has to find that tension between creating new rituals, music, uplifting messages, and offering the comfort of recognizable symbols and readings that are rooted in your tradition.  How to find that balance?  That is what you and I and, I think, every caring, aware spiritual leader does:  find that constantly shifting balance between the ancient and abiding wisdom, and the newly rediscovered, cracked-open, raw, juicy, authentic “AHA” in this very moment.

We need a tether and a nut cracker!!! Something that ties us to the rich past and at the same time leaves us free to break free and explore! Again and again… because no matter how juicy and fresh a practice is, it too gets hardened and crusty.. So once again, you have to crack it open, peel it back, and break it loose. It is a constant challenge... and that’s why it is called PRACTICE. It is always unfolding.

We need to be very deeply rooted in the gathered knowing we have inherited and studied, and also bravely willing and capable to re-dig the wells of our ancestors, as Isaac did, to dig down to the life-giving water from the wells that his father Abraham had dug before him.  Water is a symbol of life-giving Torah, and re-digging the wells is interpreted as finding our own path back to that basic understanding of oneness and connection, the underlying Source.

So gathering here for this Renewed Thought Alliance is vital, perfect, necessary, for all who have come here, hungry for additional nourishment for their soul, and thirsty for new pathways of finding that word, that song, that light that will open your hearts and elevate your spirit.  Dig deep. Fly high. Reconnect to the teachings that brought you here in the first place.  Be a shofar, realizing that each one has an individual sound, but all are created by the breath, the gift from the Holy One who breathed life into us. 

There is a prayer that I’d like to invoke now. It is for marking a special moment:    Shehechiyanu:


Baruch Ata Adonai, Eloheynu Melech Ha-olam, Shehechiyanu, v’kiymanu, vehigiyanu la-z’man ha-zeh.

We bless you Source of Life, for giving us life, sustaining us on our path, and bringing us to this most memorable and unique moment, right now. 

Amen.

(Itzhak blows shofar)

Had a moment to show my book and talk with people right after the morning session.









With Rev. Larry Swarz of Unity, Tucson, AZ






---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

 Set up:


Bring:

Shofar,

Menorah – 7 candlesticks

Nut cracker and sound effect of cracking nuts - Itzhak provides!

2 Candles (they’ll have electric ones)







Rabbi Alicia Magal www.jcsvv.org

928 204-1286
blog:
http://www.redrockrabbi.blogspot.com


"A Jewel of a Shul"


Mission Statement:
The Jewish Community of Sedona and the Verde Valley is a welcoming, egalitarian, inclusive congregation dedicated to building a link from the past to the future by providing religious, educational, social and cultural experiences. We choose to remain unaffiliated in order to respect and serve the rich diversity of our members and visitors.



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

NOTES:
Following is the script for lighting candles at the Center for Positive Living. I will not quote exactly in my talk, but will have it printed out in case anyone wishes to have it.

PS.  Two people did request it!).


Lighting the Flames of Faith – 5 Candles





We are a spiritual community that honors all teachings, all spiritual teachers, and all paths to God.



We know there is no wrong way to deepen our connection to Spirit – whether it be lighting a candle, facing east, repeating a mantra or offering prayer. 



We respect all the ways there are to draw closer to Spirit, for even though there may appear to be great differences in the path, the destination is the same.



And now we begin the ceremony that celebrates the oneness of life as we light the flames of love.



We light the first candle honoring all churches, all temples, and all mosques.  We honor all priests, all ministers, all rabbis and all spiritual teachers everywhere.



We light the second candle honoring and acknowledging that all peoples and all faiths come from the One Universal Presence, which we call Spirit.



We light the third candle honoring the oneness and unity of all life.  We recognize the Universal Presence within which creates, sustains and inspires us all.



We light the fourth candle in honor of peace, of compassion, and of fostering a world that works for the highest good of all.



As __________ lights the fifth candle, the healing candle, you are invited to bring to your awareness the names of anyone you wish to be included in this healing flame of love and light.









 

Friday, October 23, 2015

Parliament of the World’s Religions in Salt Lake City, October 15 – 19, 2015
Theme: Reclaiming the Heart of Our Humanity
Working Together for a World of Compassion, Peace, Justice, and Sustainability

 
What a lofty goal! What a grand vision!  The Parliament of the World’s Religions, this year bringing together over 9500 representatives of over 70 religions from 40 countries, first met in 1893 in Chicago.  It was reconvened at its centennial in 1993 in Chicago, then in 1999 in Capetown, South Africa; in 2004 in Barcelona, Spain; in 2009 in Melbourne, Australia; and the current gathering in 2015 in Salt Lake City.

The day preceding the formal opening of the Parliament was devoted to the Inaugural Women’s Assembly, focusing on issues pertaining to women’s dignity and human rights.  The earth itself was called “Mother” in discussions about the vital importance of honoring and protecting the environment. Panelists discussed such topics as Women, Compassion, and Social Justice; Indigenous Women’s Wisdom Sharing; and Religious and Spiritual Sources of Inspiration and Empowerment for Women.  A dramatic opening ceremony by SHeroes, a women’s dancing and drumming group dedicated to survivors of trauma, performed, each one wrapped in a bright red scarf emblazoned with the logo of SHeroes.  
SHeroes, dancing and drumming


A powerful and distinguished array of speakers brought wisdom from their own teachings and experience, including Mother Maya Tiwari, Bishop Dr. Barbara King, Marianne Williamson, and indigenous grandmothers, to name just a few.

Dr. Barbara, head shot
Dr. Barbara appeared in a flowing emerald green gown, and immediately got everyone’s attention.  No one could believe this energetic, powerful woman was 85 years old!  She exhorted everyone to “Hug yourself.”  She related how she wasn’t allowed to be a Baptist preacher, so she turned to New Thought, and insisted that we all could overcome any circumstance. She founded the Hillside Chapel, known as Hillside International Truth Center in the 1970’s. She spoke forcefully about her belief: “Hope starts… and faith completes it.”  “What you think becomes your reality.” She encouraged people to stop and rest after action since our energy is our light.  Dr. Barbara had everyone stand and hold hands to feel connected and feel each other’s joy and pain. She urged each of us to live life fully, to follow our passion, to find a support group, to use uplifting words, to give thanks, and… to be still. Just listing some of her comments doesn’t come close to feeling the electric energy of her presence.
Dr. Barbara, seated in green robe, part of panel of speakers

Marianne Williamson was also a powerhouse who roused the crowd of thousands to stand up and clap and cheer.  Each speaker had a vibrant and unique energy, a positive and inspiring message, and touched people in a profound way. 


It would be impossible to give a full description of this massive and overwhelming conference.  At any time during the day from 7:00 a.m. until the evening hours, there were about 20 sessions, screenings, discussions, and meditative practices from which to choose.  At the plenary sessions, there were thousands of people in the main hall, but the rest of the day, there were a few hundred gathered in smaller rooms, ballrooms, and halls around the large Salt Palace Conference Center.  Colorful booths displaying posters, literature, clothing, crafts, and educational opportunities filled three large halls. 




Each person attending this conference came away with a different impression, depending on the choices of sessions, and the random encounters with other attendees.  In open areas, one could observe devotional chanting, drumming, and dance.  Hundreds of Sikh volunteers prepared vegetarian meals for anyone who wished to enter, once each person covered their head with a white scarf, and removed their shoes.


An app for one’s phone contained all the information in the 300-plus page booklet describing all the sessions and the speakers. One could make choices and then save one’s personal schedule in the app. We were constantly checking our phones for the next session and asking friends where they were going. This was new technology for me, and proved very helpful in organizing the huge range of offerings.

Although most people stayed in nearby hotels, I was invited by a close friend from our rabbinical seminary to stay with her and several other rabbinic colleagues at her condo in Deer Valley, about 45 minutes’ drive up the mountain.  We had a warm reunion filled with sharing our personal and professional stories. 


The distance, however, made it impossible to attend the very early morning sessions during which various faith groups led services – Hindu meditation, a Friend’s Meeting, Devotional Yoga Satsanga, Healing Service for the World, African Religions of Brazil, Tai Chi, Chi Gong, Mystical Christian Interfaith Healing Communion, Sikh Religious Observance, Gospel Service, and many more examples.




Walking down the hall, one could see colorful banners representing world religions and cultures.  The attendees themselves were very colorful, with native dress, embroidered robes, colorful turbans, angel costumes with sparkly wings, and some in humorous costumes like the Sacred Clowns. 
        




























Erev Shabbat services led by Rabbi Marcia Prager, my mentor, and her husband, Hazzan Jack Kessler, with drummer Eli Lester, and on cello Rabbi Yitz Husbands-Hankins, were inspiring and transformative.












Compassion and respect were two oft-heard themes voiced by representatives of many faiths.  Whether we agree on our practices, we must have respect for others’ paths of devotion.  The Dalai Lama was supposed to be the guest of honor, but due to illness he wasn’t able to travel.  He taped an interview which was screened at the luncheon. He spoke with humor and conviction about the need to see ourselves as all connected.  Variations of the Golden Rule were cited as leading us to regard our fellow human beings with love.  At the gala Golden Luncheon each table was decorated with ribbons upon which were written variations of the Golden Rule. 
Just a few examples:

He should not wish for others what he does not wish for himself. – Baha’u’llah

Do to others as you would have them do to you. – Luke 6.3031

One should treat all beings as he himself would be treated. – Agama Sutrakritanga 1.10.13

What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow man.  – Talmud, Shabbat 31a.

All things are our relatives; what we do to everything, we do to ourselves. All is really One.  – Black Elk.

The heart of the person before you is a mirror.  See there your own form. – Shinto.

Regard your neighbor’s gain as your gain, and your neighbor’s loss as your own loss. – Tai Shang Kan YHin P’ien

The list of these sayings goes on for 4 pages in the Parliament book.

So with all of these respectful, compassionate, loving ideas, why is there so much distrust, hatred, and violence in the world… and in the name of religion?!  Ah, that was the question posed and discussed in many of the sessions.  Political usurping of literal religious teachings has allowed people to use messages in the sacred writings of many faiths to claim dominance and superiority or to enslave another people. The charismatic, passionate speakers all made a plea in one way or another for a return to the deeply connected, spiritual roots that proclaim the oneness of all creation. 

I was personally interested in following the sessions of the Abrahamic Reunion, a group of Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Druze, and Jews, men and women,  who all live in Israel and Palestine, and, for the past 15 years, have coordinated gatherings for dialogue under tremendous pressure and tension of the current volatile situation.  The founders and organizers, Rabbi Eliyahu McLean (yes that is right) and Shahabudden David Less, a Murshid of the Sufi order,   reach out to people in the entire spectrum of thought and practice in the Holy Land to come to meetings, meals, and ceremonies, to learn about each other.  They are a ray of hope that even when in disagreement, there can be respect and continued communication and caring.




  
My friend Ruth Sharone, a noted interfaith activist, presented songs from her musical-in-process called Interfaith, the Musical.  Delightful and touching songs.  This is going to be a hit!




I have kept the heavy volume of sessions and speakers for anyone who wishes a more in-depth description of the topics offered at the conference.

I am still digesting the sense of excitement, and sometimes slight discomfort, that I felt as a result of the waves of opinions, doctrines, and passionately-held beliefs flowing over me as I walked from session to hall to screening to one-on-one encounters.

One highlight was a concert in the famous Mormon Tabernacle, with hundreds of children from local schools, churches, mosques and clubs forming a choir.  The opening was a series of “Call to prayer” from Indigenous people, Moslem Muezzin, and blasts of the shofar from several rabbis. 




I posted colorful photos on Facebook during the day, and received many positive responses from people who could not attend, and were following my reports about the stream of speakers, musicians, artists, and cultural events. 




A group of monks worked with great skill and concentration to form a huge mandala from colored sand in the entry hall.  On the last day it was finally completed, only to be swept away as something beautiful but impermanent.  That really touched people… to invest so much energy in a beautiful product, and then have it disappear.
Perhaps that is a good metaphor for the whole experience. 
We listen, talk, exchange ideas, give great attention to learning new information, and then… where does it all go?  One hopes it is transformational within our hearts, and will lead to action in the future.  One does not need the physical, concrete evidence of what is beautiful, true, important… We must carry that inside of us. Once our heart strings have been plucked, we hear the reverberations that keep us in tune as a guide forever.









For anyone who wishes to ask questions, or see the bag full of materials from the conference, please contact me at RebAmalia@aol.com.

With blessings for respect, compassion, and honor for all beings and for the earth.

Rabbi Alicia Magal
7 p.m. Tuesday, October 20, 2015.





Coffee Talk with the Rabbi, First Tuesday

http://www.sedona.biz/news-from-sedona/coffee-talk-with-rabbi-and-sedona-city-council-representative/

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Coffee Talk

First Tuesday of the month starting August 4, I am  sitting at the Java Love Cafe in Sedona to meet anyone who wishes to come speak to me.  My friend, Angela LeFevre, who serves on our local Sedona City Council, also will be available for people to ask her questions. We set up two adjoining tables, and people came first to one of us, then switched to the other, and asked all kinds of questions.  To me, they wanted to know about the Blood Moon ( I had to look that one up!!) as well as questions about a spiritual path and how Judaism teaches awareness of time.  Great discussion of "sacred time."  To Angela, they posed questions about whether it is a good thing or not to have Sedona designated a National Monument. I look forward to the next informal meeting at the cafe, Sept. 1.
Rabbi Alicia Magal in Red Rock Rabbi cap and holding Jewish Community of Sedona mug

Terrie Frankel, standing on left, came by. Hubbetzin Itzhak Magal standing on right checked that I was ok.
Angela LeFevre is sitting between Itzhak and me.
We combined tables for this photo at one moment during the Coffee Talk visit. 

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

 Subject: surprise Sunday adventure 8.3.15

Daughter Alicia  writes:  My mother Nika has been sending me emails nearly each day, describing her adventures of meeting people at the marina on her walks, at the library, at the lake… and each encounter was special, warm, a real connection with young people who bought her book From Miracle to Miracle: A Story of Survival, or came over to visit at her studio, or just had a “moment.”  This day was different, started out with a slightly down feeling, but ended “up”….  I am sending out this blog and conserving some of her breathless punctuation.. rarely a comma or period, just a series of dashes.   

Nika’s report:
The day started not well-   being tired  and  kind of missing my whole  family –feeling  blue.  
        
After my afternoon nap felt much better, and decided to go to our air-conditioned library- always a great pleasure for me. 
Neomi helped me with my cell phone -  always  so friendly- Joyce always ready with a solution to any problem-  love that place.
No swimming to day  too hot   -  so decided  to return home. As I was driving something made me turn to the Book Store Restaurant-  the pull  was  very strong  for no apparent reason. Well I can always eat  something and enjoy  the bay   -  why not.
To my total surprise  I found a big party going on -  asked  the waiter  the reason-Carol’s  80 Birthday.
WOW-   Remember  this lovely place  for so many years  - today  first time  met  Carol’s beautiful  granddaughters Taylor  and Morgan  and  the father Todd (Norwegian  descent).
  
I only knew Carol Ann the daughter  and her son with a pony tail….
In 1948 when I first arrived  in Wellfleet and fell in love with Cape Cod I saw a used book store and magazines in a small building on Mayo Beach.  The owner to my surprise spoke Polish  - although both his wife and he - retired policeman -were Lithuanian.
 
I was curious to see what went on in US while we were fighting, starving in Warsaw  and found 3 Life magazines describing  activities in  '40-43 years here in America..  I started crying-  when I realized no one had any idea what we were going through in Poland  - Europe-  they had Ms. America contest.  
This started my friendship with  the family and book store restaurant became my second home through nearly 70 summers.

Today I had to be there to sing 100 years  (sto lat in Polish) to Carol  - best wishes  and delighted  to have met  the younger generation  .

Best wishes from my 4  generations  -  my husband  Fred Fleissig loved  the place.
Duzo  calusow  (many kisses) from 95 year old  smiling Nika Kohn Fleissig and my whole family.


Alicia adds:  You can look up on the internet  Life Magazine Covers 1940… one can see them all but cannot copy them.
Some of the covers for 1940 were Silk shawls in fashion,   Girl lifeguard, Vacations on a sailboat, Roosevelt wins 3rd term, girl in heart and flowers hat entitled Floral Valentines, Fancy ranch duds, Ginger Rogers, Lana Turner, Party season, ’British in Egypt....
The 1942 selection of covers is very different: These covers reflect America’s engagement in war: Nursing shortage, Coastal defense, Air force women’s auxiliary, US warplanes, USO singer and soldier, Brooklyn Navy Yard, Bombardier school, dancing in frilly frock Joan Leslie,  Eye-catcher hats, Short coats (lots of leg showing),   so fashion and film were still considered cover-worthy. Really fascinating – check out 1943… one cover features a POW’s wife. War was a reality but kind of far away for Americans.





- Nika Fleissig

Please Read My Blog Here:
http://www.lifebeginsat90.blogspot.com/

Order our book, From Miracle To Miracle: A Story of Survival (via PayPal):
http://www.FromMiracleToMiracle.com

Please view my art here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nikafleissig/

 
Rabbi Alicia Magal www.jcsvv.org

928 204-1286
blog:
http://www.redrockrabbi.blogspot.com


"A Jewel of a Shul"


Mission Statement:
The Jewish Community of Sedona and the Verde Valley is a welcoming, egalitarian, inclusive congregation dedicated to building a link from the past to the future by providing religious, educational, social and cultural experiences. We choose to remain unaffiliated in order to respect and serve the rich diversity of our members and visitors.